Time to Get Serious – Veggie Update IV

In this post I have inserted a number of photos so that you can see progress on the plot, including that of the Bramley apples which in a recent post I showed the delicate blossom of this fruit tree. Don’t be fooled by the jollity of the photos mind, it really is time to get serious – I spent most of Tuesday planting out the Kale seedlings in a new bed, thinning out the brassicas and doing some temporary planting. We have to wait for the potatoes to yield their crop and in so doing release a bit more of the cultivated land in which to plant out properly our burdgeoning nursery.  A couple of rows of spinach have been pulled to give more room as quite simply they weren’t being used fast enough. So last night I spent the evening processing the spinach into bags which are now stored in the freezer. First attempt at freezing spinach, having checked it out on the internet. So simple, so handy.

As the Kale is planted out, the advancing weeds look to engulf the roller.
As the Kale is planted out, the advancing weeds look to engulf the roller.

By looking at the ground beyond which we are working, the above picture gives some idea as to what the plot looked like prior to cultivation. The weeds from the field below look as if they have reclaimed the roller – time for the scythe to come out. It’s only when I see an image like that do I appreciate all the work that has gone into making the plot what it is today. The next picture not only highlights that the beetroot needs thinning, but reveals that we are not the only ones enjoying the radishes, the markings of a slug clearly visible on the radish in the foreground.

Beetroot thriving while slugs attack the radish.
Beetroot thriving while slugs attack the radish.

As for the strawberries, they are still coming on one strawberry at a time, The Sage finally getting a taste for himself last week. While the forecast is a lot better we have caught a new vermin attacking the strawberries, despite the covering of chicken wire to act as a deterrent. The vermin is brown and white, has a sweet tooth, has worked out how to thrust his nose under the base of the wire and lift the whole covering up, leading to easy access of the fruit. The Hound really can be a real rogue at times, albeit loveable.

Beware of the Dog
Beware of the Dog

The courgette and the cucumber plants are recovering well, having not been sufficiently hardened off before facing the Irish weather, and are somewhat behind schedule. The Sage still worries about his potatoes with my latest assignment being to see if I can get a “blight forecast”.  As for the Bramley blossom, in less than a month the flowers have given way to budding fruit, so the apple pies will be all go later in the year.

One for the apple pies
One for the apple pies

And now to the really serious stuff. Not only have I caught The Sage with a bottle of tomato liquid food (which he claims is well out of date) but he has erected a special glass encasing in order to cosset his tomato plant and deprive me of €5. So that is it, the gloves are off, the tomato challenge has just got serious. Time for retaliation. In the picture below the new tomato hot house structure can be seen behind the rhubarb plants which have flourished so well that we have resorted to giving away its offerings.

Behind the rhubarb the tomatoes are given their own little hothouse.
Behind the rhubarb the tomatoes are given their own little hothouse.
The Sage gets desperate for €5
The Sage gets desperate for €5

In the lower picture you will note two tomato plants and I can assure you I am having to keep my eyes firmly on The Sage as I am well aware that the ‘competition’ tomato is the one on the right. So there is much to do up in the vegetable plot, apart from taking in the Spotted Flycatchers, and as the title states, it really is time to get serious.

MM

9 thoughts on “Time to Get Serious – Veggie Update IV

  1. I had to come back to this blog to see what the challenge was all about,as I have just started following you 🙂 I am now intrigued to see who wins,even though the Sage seems to be cheating a bit…lol

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  2. I am ever more inspired to pursue eating more greens. I do love kale . It’s part of my veggie smoothie. I wish i have a backyard like yours. My dad still plants fruits and vegetables in a vacant lot next to our house. Reading your post reminds me of the simple yet important aspect of life. Thanks.

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    1. Thanks Island Traveller, most gracious of you. I myself overlook so much, but find that with doing this blog I am seeing so much more. If anything I need to hold myself back as I still have all the mundane stuff that we all have to do…MM 🍀

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  3. It sounds like such a labour of love – all the back-breaking hard work that goes in, repays you with such a wonderful abundance of fresh food. Must admit that I’m just a little envious of your fertile plot in Ireland! Lovely to see the progress through such seasonal photos.

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    1. Thanks for this. It amazed me when as a kid a bus load of children were brought to our village from the nearby city and some of them had never seen a cow before. I was gobsmacked. In the same way I hope that some people can get to see the (hopeful) progress of our amateurish undertaking and find it interesting. MM

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