People of North Vietnam

In doing a trek for a few days in the north of Vietnam we stayed in a couple of home stays, eating dinner with the host families. Fortunately our guide acted as translator, though the nods, smiles and waggy fingers  also served us well. Sign language was not so useful in the frequent cuts in the electricity supply. By moving further away from the hill town of Sapa on foot through small paths and tracks we got glimpses of real rural scenes unused to the clicking of cameras. It was so refreshing.

In the first picture below a young girl ties a sheaf in a field next to a track. In the second, a group of three Black Hmong girls dressed in traditional clothes take a break from using their scythes to watch a run-away buffalo go charging down the carefully constructed tiers of paddy terraces.

Tying the Sheaf
Tying the Sheaf
Black Hmong in the Fields
Black Hmong in the Fields

8 thoughts on “People of North Vietnam

  1. What…no shot of the rampaging water buffalo? 🙂 Curious question, why are they referred to as Black Hmong? The girls in your photo do not appear to be dark skinned. Or is there another connotation?

    Are you still on holiday? If yes, continue to enjoy. If you’ve returned, welcome home and back to the blogosphere.

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    1. It has nothing to do with the skin colour. Typically it pertains to their clothing or specific item – the Red Dao for example wear a bright red headpiece with tassels, the Black Hmong are so called because of their dark clothes, the Flower Hmong are so called due to the bright vivid multi colours of their clothes….. Hope that helps inform. Just back from holidays and catching up…MM 👍

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  2. These scenes are very similar to ones you can find in the Philippines. It’s a shame that although the Philippines is very close to Vietnam, I have never been there. It’s interesting for me to see Vietnam through your lense. 🙂

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      1. Unfortunately, I haven’t been home in a very LONG time. It was too long ago, that I didn’t even own a digital camera when I left. 🙂 When my children are grown, (i.e. old enough to behave when travelling) we’d probably go back there for a visit.

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